Is Microsoft is becoming a Linux vendor?

On Microsoft’s own Azure cloud, 75% of machines run Linux. These are Microsoft customers who are running Linux. Microsoft needs to support the platform they use, or they will go somewhere else.

To that end, Microsoft has written a Linux subsystem in Windows, that allows users/admins to run bash commands.

Is Microsoft’s victory a loss for traditional Linux vendors? To some degree, yes. Microsoft has become a direct competitor. But the clear winner here is Linux.

Microsoft doesn’t own any Linux technologies. They are totally dependent on an external vendor, in this case Canonical, for their entire Linux layer. Too risky a proposition, if Canonical gets acquired by a fierce competitor.

Read the full story from CIO magazine here

Why is Microsoft showing so much interest in Linux? 

Why is Microsoft showing so much interest in Linux? 

An operating system only matters because it is a platform for applications. Apps make money for businesses and productivity for individuals — i.e. they deliver the real value of computing.

Answer by Mathew Lodge, Board member of CNCF, a Linux Foundation project, on Quora:

Microsoft has decided that the operating system is no longer an important battleground, and that it’s more important to gain market share in cloud (Azure and Office 365) than it is to put energy into battling Linux for application market share. <more>