Is Microsoft is becoming a Linux vendor?

On Microsoft’s own Azure cloud, 75% of machines run Linux. These are Microsoft customers who are running Linux. Microsoft needs to support the platform they use, or they will go somewhere else.

To that end, Microsoft has written a Linux subsystem in Windows, that allows users/admins to run bash commands.

Is Microsoft’s victory a loss for traditional Linux vendors? To some degree, yes. Microsoft has become a direct competitor. But the clear winner here is Linux.

Microsoft doesn’t own any Linux technologies. They are totally dependent on an external vendor, in this case Canonical, for their entire Linux layer. Too risky a proposition, if Canonical gets acquired by a fierce competitor.

Read the full story from CIO magazine here

BMW deploys Red Hat OpenShift container platform

BMW deploys Red Hat OpenShift container platform

BMW Group, the world’s leading premium manufacturer of automobiles and motorcycles, has deployed Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform to support its delivery of business applications and services.

“After the decomposition of traditional applications into micro-services running on containers, Red Hat OpenShift container platform enables the BMW Group to do point scaling to adjust loads to peaks and troughs in demand, and to deliver the continuous service that today’s consumers expect,” explains Red Hat.

Full Story – http://red.ht/2qwVkEE 

Ansible’s rise is fueling Red Hat’s reinvention

The reason Ansible is so popular within Red Hat’s field is that it’s wildly popular with enterprise IT. How popular? Well, Ansible already finds its way into a third of all Red Hat deals, as Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst indicated on the company’s most recent earnings call. That is staggering when you consider that Red Hat didn’t acquire Ansible until late 2015, and Ansible didn’t even exist as a project until 2012 or as a company until 2013. For Ansible to be contributing in a significant way to Red Hat’s $2 billion-plus in annual revenue is a major accomplishment.

More at Infoworld

Red Hat Brings Cloud Native Services to Every Java Workload – OpenShift Blog

To help Java developers manage the transition, Red Hat is happy to announce the availability of a Java container image for cloud native workloads. Red Hat now expands the availability of cloud native packaging models to all Java applications that rely on OpenJDK and Maven. This builds on the proven S2I technology that has been available for OpenShift applications for many years.

Source: Red Hat Brings Cloud Native Services to Every Java Workload – OpenShift Blog