After reading an article about Amazon AWS Route 53 taking on, and running into to a few issues with my WordPress website on Microsoft Azure, I decided to give Amazon AWS a try.

I found creating a Linux VM very easy.  No instructions needed, the UI was very intuitive. I thought creating the WordPress site would be more difficult on AWS.  After all, I had run into a number of challenges with the “automated” WordPress installs on Microsoft Azure (provided by ClearDB and Bitnami).  In short, I spent many hours with tech support from both companies.  Some issues were major, others more trivial – yet still important. For example, Bitnami puts in an annoying “dog ear” in the bottom right corner of the your home page with their logo.  But I digress…

I was pleased to find that creating a WordPress site on AWS (manually) was straight forward.  The instructions were very well written:


Tutorial: Installing a LAMP Web Server on Amazon Linux

Tutorial: Hosting a WordPress Blog with Amazon Linux

Heading Down Route 53

After getting a default WordPress site up and running (in about 30 minutes).  The next step was to transfer my domain name.  I read the AWS Route 53 domain transfer instructions and had some questions.

Transferring a Domain to Amazon Route 53

However, I found a nice, brief (~1 minute) video on youtube that answered all my questions.  Kudos to Sibercat X.

How to Transfer your Domain to AWS Route 53 From Godaddy.

The Transfer Process (and the missing step)

In a nutshell, you start your domain transfer to Route 53 by logging on to and clicking: Manage your domain.  You click on unlock and get an email with your authorization code:

Godaddy-email authentication email

The next step is to plug in your authorization code to the AWS Route 53 console and away you go.

Sitting, Waiting, Wishing

However, 12 hours later, I was still waiting  A check of my AWS Route 53 console reveals the following (step 7 of 14):

AWS Route 53 – Step 7

I decided to do a quick Google search to figure out what’s taking so long.  After all, this can’t be a manual process, it has to automated end-to-end.  I find the following explanation:

Waiting for the current registrar to complete the transfer (step 7 of 14)

Your current registrar is confirming that your domain meets the requirements for being transferred. Requirements vary among TLDs, but the following requirements are typical:

  • You must have registered the domain with the current registrar at least 60 days ago.
  • If the registration for a domain name expired and had to be restored, it must have been restored at least 60 days ago.
  • You must have transferred registration for the domain to the current registrar at least 60 days ago.
  • The domain cannot have any of the following domain name status codes:
    • clientTransferProhibited
    • pendingDelete
    • pendingTransfer
    • redemptionPeriod

The first three bullets are straight forward, I know they don’t apply to me.  However, I find the sub bullet status codes cryptic.  Instead of searching Google again, I decide to log back in to and look around  I click the manage my domain button and voila – I find the problem.  There’s an undocumented step in the transfer instructions. makes you go back and accept the transfer a second time (even after accepting the initial transfer request link from their email). Here’s what you’ll see in’s console:

godaddy-accept – Accept

All you need to do is click on Accept and away you go, you’re on to Step 8.


Liner notes.  The title of this article came from a song by Jack Johnson.